Skip to main content
The Democratic convention on Monday night was one to watch. The tribute to Sen. Kennedy was marvelous and Michelle Obama proved she will be an excellent first lady.She was articulate in illustrating and imaging Obama as a family man with the ability to lead a nation. The "dream still lives and hope never dies" ! powerful words indeed.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Review of "Reversed Thunder" by Eugene Peterson

In the book Reversed Thunder “The Revelation of John & the Praying Imagination”, Eugene H. Peterson writes a remarkable analysis and interpretation on the biblical text Revelation. Historically, the book of Revelation has been described as difficult to interpret by theologians. Consequently, preachers and teachers of the bible have tended to ignore or avoid this segment of scripture. In stark contrast, those who choose the difficult task of interpreting this text have diverse and drastically different opinions. However, Peterson with powerful vivid illustrations and analysis opens and simplifies the interpretation of Revelation to his readers. This book is a must read for any preacher, teacher and scholar of the Holy Writ. Specifically, I highly recommend this book for any reader of Revelation, who has been bombarded with confusing and confound translations of this remarkable text.
Peterson defines revelation and apocalypse at the outset of his book. “St. John’s word for what he …

"The Prophetic Imagination" by Walter Brueggemann

In the magnificent book, The Prophetic Imagination by Walter Brueggemann, the reader is impacted by the author’s unique paradigm concerning the interpretation of the biblical text. Brueggemann deftly sets new parameters for biblical scholars to interpret scripture, specifically the prophetic texts. In this revised second edition, the author illustrates the restraints of the utilization of historical criticism by biblical scholars. For instance, the author speaks of the environment of biblical study during the first edition of his book in 1978. Brueggemann states that “at that time, however scripture study generally awaited the articulation of methods that moved beyond or underneath historical criticism of a conventional kind. Specifically, social-scientific criticism, stunningly introduced into Old Testament studies by Norman Gottwald in 1979-the year after my book - opened the way to see texts as ideological statements evoked by and evoking specific forms of social action and policy…

Christianity and Globalism

In John Ralston Saul’s book, "The Collapse of Globalism and the Reinvention of the World", the reader is inundated with the author’s views on the historical growth of the concept of globalism and the consequences of that growth. In addition, Saul argues of the slow, but inevitable demise of globalism. Saul defines, after much debate and analysis, the notion of globalization as “an inevitable form of internationalism in which civilization is reformed from the perspective of economic leadership. The leadership here is provided not by people, but by the innate force of economics at work; that is the marketplace.”[1] It is significant to note, that Saul includes in his definition the thoughts of Thomas Friedman. Specifically, the idea of the “diminished competence of states”[2]. Friedman envisioned “the inexorable integration of markets, nation-states and technologies to a degree never witnessed before.”[3] John Ralston Saul bases his inevitable “collapse of globalism” theory on…